Even Mitch McConnell Says Wolff Is Lying, Calls Him Out on False Story

While many in the liberal media are pretending socialite author Michael Wolff’s new anti-Trump book is the unvarnished truth, many key individuals quoted in the hit piece are disavowing statements the book attributes to them. Wolff’s book, titled, “Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House,” was released Friday and is already one of the top-selling items on Amazon. But many of the claims liberals are obsessing over have already been proven to be utterly groundless. As reported by Newsmax, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, slammed an assertion in Wolff’s book that the Kentucky Republican blew off a meeting with President Donald Trump last year to get a haircut. “I can confirm: this never happened,” said McConnell’s deputy chief of staff Don Stewart via Twitter. In his book, Wolff claimed that Trump’s staff tried to arrange a meeting with McConnell to quell tensions between the two leaders, but majority leader decided to keep a barber’s appointment instead. In an email to Vox, Stewart said the claim was completely false. “No one ‘blew him off’ and in fact, the meeting occurred as soon as members returned to Washington after Labor Day,” Stewart said, adding that no staffer “ever turned down the meeting citing a haircut. That never happened. The author didn’t bother to check either of those points and ended up getting both wrong in his book (as he did with so many others).” McConnell isn’t the only one excoriating Wolff’s tome of nonsense. Trump and many others have refuted key claims in the book. On Thursday, Trump tweeted that Wolff’s entire book was “full of lies, misrepresentations, and sources that don’t exist.” Many others followed his lead. Stephanie Grisham, a spokeswoman for first lady Melania Trump, said: “The book is clearly going to be sold in the bargain fiction section. Mrs. Trump supported her husband’s decision to run for president and in fact, encouraged him to do so. She was confident he would win and was very happy when he did.” Anna Wintour, the longtime Vogue editor, fired back at an assertion in the book that she begged Trump to appoint her as his ambassador to the United Kingdom, calling Wolff’s claim: “laughably preposterous.” Former British Prime Minister Tony Blair, who Wolff wrote in the book warned Trump he was under surveillance by British spies, called the claims “categorically absurd” and “simply untrue.” In on obvious sign of a credibility problem, Wolff admitted in an author’s note in the book that even he couldn’t verify all of the information he wrote and presented as being accurate. The main point is that many top individuals have already slammed the book as peddling falsehoods and being nothing but tabloid gossip. In the presidency of Donald Trump, of course, liberals have abandoned even pretending to believe that truth is important if a story can make the White House look bad. But in the case of the Wolff book, some in the mainstream media, liberal websites and the Democrat Party’s moneybag mega-donors are seemingly convinced it is akin to the Pentagon Papers for inside-the-government whistleblowing. But the reality is uglier. All McConnell has in common with the president is the “R” after their names. The two men have had a rocky relationship since before Trump won the GOP nomination and not been particularly congenial since. And if McConnell, hardly a friend to Trump, is saying Wolff’s book is a lie, that speaks volumes about its inaccuracies. If this is what Democrats hope to build their midterm campaigns around, the party is in deep, deep trouble. www.conservativetribune.com